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Official Site of Rich Hoffman. Connecting the dots in a complicated world.

Infectious: The Magic of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, it’s not just football

with 14 comments

Even though Tampa Bay lost big today it is important to have adversity because it builds character, and when a young team like the Bucs are have been winning at will, they sometimes take things for granted.  So losses are opportunities to build character, because the overall franchise is more than one game and this article is about the “bigger picture.”  The young kids will bounce back and solve their problems, because the foundation beneath the loss is of high quality.  And such a lesson is one everyone faces at some time or another whether it be an individual, or an organization. Winning all the time does not challenge the soul, overcoming something that shakes your foundations do.    And with all the talk on this site about failure in government, it is because they do not go back to the film room and figure out whyThey just ask for a “bailout,” and lose time and again without improvement and use higher taxes to prop up their self-esteem.  A football team does not have the option of raising taxes.  They have to dig deep and improve themselves.

To understand why any group or other interest that stands in the way of innovation infuriates me to the levels it does, I feel I must open the door just a bit more into my personal beliefs since you and I know each other just a bit better than we used to. In my life I am attracted to personalities who reach beyond the static patterns of convention, and in my opinion nothing else is worthy of my attention. I feel that way about my entertainment, my politics, my friends, and my sports. So I ask you dear reader to suspend your thoughts for just a moment, long enough to read this article. It doesn’t matter if you like a different NFL team than me, or even have different politics than I do, just suspend your beliefs for just a while and let me take you into the great temple which is Raymond James Stadium and let me share with you the richness you will find there. Click the video below to see how a football game begins in that palace of ingenuity. (THAT’S WHAT APPEARS ON THE JUMBO TRON)

On any given Sunday in the falling leaves of autumn, at the end of my driveway you will see two flags. You will also see flags all the way up my driveway and on the porch of my house also. And in the living room on football Sunday, it’s always Halloween, even at Christmas, as skulls, smoke machines and more flags are displayed. But the flags at the end of my driveway are special, very special, because they were given to me by the owner of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers himself and are the focus of my enjoyment of that football team which is run by that very innovative and generous family in one of my favorite cities, Tampa Bay.

To understand the history of why I’m a Tampa Bay Buccaneer fan, please see two of my previous articles on this subject.

http://overmanwarrior.wordpress.com/2010/10/18/why-tampa-bay-buccaneer-football-is-the-best/

http://overmanwarrior.wordpress.com/2010/12/14/throwback-game-at-tampa-bay/

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers as an ownership represents much about my own style of management, and ideas about how all organizations should work They have as a franchise produced an extraordinary number of great players, coaches, and personalities who now populate the TV analyst’s booth on every sports channel. But they have done so without a lot of hoopla and fanfare, unless you happen to live in Tampa Bay. To the world outside of Tampa Bay, The Buccaneers are just another NFL team. The media doesn’t really understand why they are special, only that there is something unique going on in the Bay City of Florida that they sometimes contemplate with empty questions, and even emptier answers.

Players have come and gone, and coaches too, but in Tampa Bay there has been a consistency of always being competitive, of at least being an exciting team to watch no matter what year it was. The history of the team runs deep. Unfortunately, because NFL teams cannot afford to keep all their highly paid players, due to business limits, a team like the Buccaneers must always push the limits and dig deep to find ways to win even when they lose their best talent.

After losing coaches like John Gruden, which was a business decision, Monte Kiffin, the future Hall-of-Fame defensive coordinator, Warren Sapp, John Lynch, Derrick Brooks, (due to age) and many, many others including the power running full-back Mike Alstott, Tampa seemed out of cannon balls after nearly a decade of dominate defense and trend setting achievements as a franchise. All over the country, sports reporters were predicting doom and gloom for the Buccaneers. But I wasn’t, and neither were the Glazers. The Glazers knew they had been breeding talent down in Tampa for years and decided that if they were losing all that great talent on all sides of the ball, including coaches that they needed to look internally for the next great coach to build their team and maintain their reputation. The Glazers were not looking to an “outsider” to just merely win games in Tampa Bay. The Glazers wanted to preserve their culture that they had built, a static culture that required someone who had always been there and grown up in the organization all along, starting as a very young man.

It wasn’t hard for me to predict that Raheem Morris would be the next head coach of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The Bucs had lost Mike Tomlin to the Pittsburg Steelers who was a coach in Tampa just a few years prior, and they weren’t going to lose the much sought after assistant coach in Raheem to another team, because Morris had grown up with all those great players and coaches on the inside, and the Glazers had enough understanding of what they brought to the NFL to keep a coach who could maintain their culture with a dynamic personality full of energy. So the Bucs promoted Raheem Morris to head coach and defensive coordinator, which was unprecedented in the NFL and drew much criticism from virtually every expert in the industry. Many were saying that Tampa Bay Buccaneer Football was on its way out.

Except me…….and I let Bryan Glazer know it after a series of terrible loses where the youngest head coach in the NFL was struggling through his first season with a decimated team lost to free agency, and age. But Raheem is the kind of guy who never quits, and his personality is as my wife says……infectious, so it was only a matter of time before Raheem turned things around and got the Tampa Bay Buccaneers playing the caliber of football everyone expected from this very dynamic organization, a team that could live up to that Jumbo Tron intro. Bryan sent me those flags in thanks because it was a tough time for he and his family. Virtually everyone was calling them stupid, cheap, and out-of-touch for hiring Morris when Bill Parcels had indicated he wanted the Tampa job, and news analysts were chipping away at the Glazer family credibility at every opportunity. But they trusted their instincts and stayed with Morris, and I thought a kind word would go a long way in their darkest hour. So Bryan sent me those flags in thanks. Those flags aren’t the kind you can buy from a street vender or even on EBay. They are only passed out during home playoff games, so they are very rare. Bryan gave me the ones he had on his desk.

Meet Raheem Morris here, and let him show you around the Tampa Bay Organization:

I love his energy! One of the first things he did after his first dismal season was draft Josh Freeman, which drew an extraordinary amount of criticism, because many felt that Freeman was not a marquee quarterback, because there were much higher profile quarterbacks on the block and that Morris was out-of-his mind for taking Freeman!

Most fans had the same reaction as that guy, but Raheem knew what he was doing and the Glazers trusted his decisions, even if everyone in the world thought Raheem Morris was out of his mind. In this early interview, you can see much of what Morris saw in the young Josh Freeman, a mature kid even-keeled who would not panic in the 4th quarter under pressure and would provide a stable platform all the other players could build themselves around.

Another controversial player that Raheem Morris went after which nobody understood was LeGarrette Blount, a fiery young running back from Oregon who seemed to have a very violent temper. Blount would have been drafted higher if not for this fight which would haunt him even to this very day, as sports analysts will not forget the incident. Blount is one of those people who were destined to fall between the cracks because nobody with any sort of vision would look beyond his brutal will to fight, which was mistaken as a ruthless will to win, at any cost.

I saw the game with Blount and I noticed how he squared his shoulders to invite the fight, and was not afraid. He seemed to run the ball the same way, without fear and with a fury. I saw something unique in the kid, and Morris obviously saw the same thing. But the Tennessee Titans missed this genius, because Blount’s fighting didn’t stop in the Titans training camp, again, here is a kid who will fight for every inch and does not understand what the word “quit” is. Here is Blount in just a practice where he loses his helmet and still won’t let the defense stop him, which triggers a violent exchange.

Raheem convinced the Buccaneer Organization to sign Blount as an unsigned free agent once the Titans cut him. Because Morris has such an “infectious” personality, Tampa Bay was able to get a hold of a player similar to Warren Sapp only on the offensive side of the ball. Tampa for the first time since Mike Alstott had a runner in the back-field that could pound the ball in a way the Buc fans had come to expect. Warren Sapp had the calm and cool Tony Dungy to keep Sapp from flying apart in rage. And Blount now had the bubbly and good personality of Morris to compliment his very natural aggression and provide leadership and direction so that LeGarrette Blount could be what he was built to be, one of the greatest running backs of this modern age.

LeGarrette Blount is pure, raw energy, but the credit to giving this kid a chance, belongs to Raheem Morris. Have a look at what Blount has been able to do for the Bucs.

The organization isn’t just those two guys. There are dozens of similar young people who have been quietly recruited into the Buccaneers and they are too numerous to list here. What becomes quickly apparent when studied is that Tampa Bay as a franchise recruits dynamic personalities into a static pattern established by the Glazer Family to use those dynamics to always push-off the competition within the NFL over a long period of time. It is within that statement that I am so passionate about Tampa Bay Buccaneer Football. I am not a person who cares for stats, or even individual players. I am all about dynamic patterns used to make a static pattern great, or better. (SEE THIS LINK TO UNDERSTAND WHAT I MEAN BY STATIC AND DYNAMIC PATTERNS.) In fact, even with all the great players and coaches, even when it came down to the treasured veteran linebacker Derrick Brooks, who was the ideal icon of the franchise, when he become too old to maintain the static pattern of expectation the Glazers let him go, just as they did Sapp, Lynch, Gruden and many others. It wasn’t out of disloyalty, although the fans did feel that way. It was that the Glazers put the high level static pattern of their team ahead of their loyalty to personalities. When the dynamic personalities are no longer effective, the Glazers look for new personalities to keep the Buccaneers continuously competitive.

It is true that this does hurt them at the ticket booth, as fans do fall in love with individual players, and many sports fans keep careful track of the various statistics of those players. But the Glazers have always maintained this discipline to their organization, which is unique to them. They fired my favorite coach in Sam Wyche to hire Tony Dungy. They fired Tony, even though they loved him in Tampa because Tony had stalled out and become less effective so they could hire John Gruden. And when Gruden had lost his touch with the players and become mediocre, Tampa fired Gruden, considered by many to be one of the best minds in football, to hire Raheem Morris, the young assistant who quietly absorbed all the greatness of the men who came before him. And Raheem knows that if he becomes complacent and stops bringing a dynamic to his team which protects the static pattern of quality that is expected with the Tampa Bay Franchise, he’ll be let go also. It’s not personal, but for the Glazers, they have a dedication to putting on the field at every level a quality product.

This mentality even extends to the Cheerleaders who are among the best of any NFL team. Not only are their costumes appropriate along that fine line between sex appeal, and family friendly style, but their choreography as a dance unit is top-notch, and has been since the construction of Raymond James Stadium. When attending a game at Ray Jay you will be treated to these cheerleaders who perform with precision in between plays in an overall show that is complete for the entire 3 to 4 hours you are inside that palace.

And it’s not unusual for the Buccaneer Cheerleaders to do many community events and appearances all over town exhibiting their quality performances as a dance team. The philosophy of these Buc Cheerleaders is to bring the sex appeal expected from a cheerleader in the NFL with a style and work ethic similar to a Broadway Dancer.

It’s in the details however that makes just an average organization great. It’s a multitude of little dynamics which tend to preserve the greatness of a static pattern in competition with other static patterns, and in the NFL all teams have great players and football minds that are seeking to destroy each other’s season. And in Tampa Bay if the cheerleaders don’t keep people excited about the product on the field during this epic battle between the players themselves, then the Pirate Ship that sites in Buccaneer Cove, which is a replica of a giant Caribbean Village, will. All the props in the stadium are built by the same company who builds for Walt Disney World and the Pirate Ship is one of the most unique features for a sports stadium in the entire world. There is nothing like it anywhere!

It was this Pirate Ship which earned my eternal loyalty to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Being from Cincinnati, I know the history of their stadium debacle up close, and the ironic thing is, before Paul Brown Stadium was built, the Bengals toured Raymond James Stadium for ideas, but they seemed to miss most everything in their interpretation. Raymond James Stadium is the centerpiece of activity in Tampa. When they aren’t playing football there for the Buccaneers, it might be football with the South Florida Bulls, or a Monster Truck event, or a concert, or an equestrian event, Raymond James Stadium hosts events all through the year, was built completely with community money but gives back to the community in so many ways without compromising the integrity of being the home of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Raymond James Stadium is the Crown Jewel of the NFL and all sports establishments. It is the best of the best even when others have tried to copy it. The difference is most ownerships attempt to duplicate the luxury boxes and vending sales, without understanding the dynamic relationship connected to the fan experience. This is why most have failed when attempting to duplicate the success of Raymond James Stadium, home of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

And this is why even when I don’t get to fly to Tampa for a game I duplicate the experience at my home on a Sunday afternoon. Because being a fan of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers is about more than a football team, it’s a celebration of the success of merging dynamic quality patterns with static patterns and how that balance can be achieved successfully.

Many who know me are baffled by the fact that I love the Buccaneers so much, because I tend to read a lot and don’t seem like the type of person who would enjoy “tailgating” and cheering for a player to carry a ball across a green field to cross a little line on the ground where the team gets points. (Such a thing is rather silly in the greater scheme of things) But in truth, some of my favorite people are in Florida, and Tampa has many people in it that I call my friends, and those friendships have in common a love of the Buccaneers because their success bleeds over into other aspects of life. And I don’t give out friendship easily. But in regard to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers who even over their practice field fly a giant pirate flag that looms over the players to remind them of where they are and what they are expected to do, innovation and encouragement to reach deep inside to bring out greatness is encouraged in every act exerted. You can see that flag in the next clip. When people visiting Tampa Bay fly into the International Airport if they look out the east window of their craft, that flag is the first thing they will see in Tampa Bay, for it inundates the horizon.

But the secrets to a great organization are in many of the unsung positions, and the Buccaneers value their former players, even if they let them go to avoid salary cap problems where those players become too expensive for what they bring to the field of play. They promoted the linebacker Shelton Quarles to a scout which keeps his dynamic talent under the umbrella of the Buccaneer Franchise and allows the Bucs to locate passionate players who fit into the static expectations of the organization, because if anyone knows what kind of player should be in a Buccaneers locker room or on the field, it’s Shelton.

When I was growing up, as I pointed out in another article on the Buccaneers, my nickname was “Animal.” I like Blount had a problem with fighting. I could not take a hit without fighting back and I never knew when to quit. (I still don’t) because I would be bored in life without some kind of fight or another. No coach wanted me on a football team because I never took direction well, and I had no tolerance for the politics of school football. If I had met someone like a Raheem Morris when I was 16 through 22 I might have played football for a guy like that, because Morris, and the Glazers know how to tap into those types of individuals that other organizations overlook, or take for granted who move through life on the outside of establishment. And the Buccaneers know that it is in such dynamic people who a competitive edge over an opponent can be found. So it is with that in mind that I feel an affinity for LeGarrette Blount. I can relate to the kid. It will be interesting to see how he handles success, once money finds its way to him. I hope it doesn’t change the kind of man he has a chance to be. I’m sure that Raheem Morris is having those kinds of talks with the young man.

So as we contemplate education reform, and the role of government in society, I rest my mind from the burdens of the day and dedicate my valuable time to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers whenever they play because on every occasion that I doubt the validity of an idea I can look to that organization as a symbol of how things should or could be. I see upon that organization at every single level a passion for finding a dynamic which will make them better without compromising their static quality. I see an indulgence in more than just a game, but a philosophy that not only benefits the team and ownership of the Buccaneers, but the entire community themselves. It is the entire experience of the quality achieved at all these various levels which put the smile on a face of a young boy and ignite in him a hope that anything is possible. Or it brings delight to the over-weight middle-aged man stuck in a rut in his life to see gladiators give it their all on the field of battle, or the bored mother who holds up her hands to have beads thrown upon her head from the pirate ship in Buccaneer Cove. It is an entire city that is the better for the fact that the Buccaneers guard selfishly their unique brand of football in an NFL League that is all-too-focused on quarterbacks and statistics, that they often miss the magic of the dynamic in human spirit. Too often those types upon a confounded brow wonder how such characters came to be but for someone like the Glazer family created the conditions for the unique to blossom, and capture in those weekly battles a magic which enhances the lives of thousands.

Yo, ho, YO, HO, It’s a pirates life for me, and on Sunday’s I fly my flags proudly and think of Raymond James Stadium, the Glazer Family, the Pirate Ship, Raheem Morris and the various Buc players both past and present who live and fight the way I think all people should play at life, with passion, enthusiasm, and eternal hope, pounding one yard at a time for the end zones of life if only to hear the celebration of cannon fire and the cheering of a crowd under the gentle gaze of a October Sun.

Win, or lose, I am a fan of Buccaneer Football!  Because it’s easy to be a fan when your team wins, or there is money in your pocket.  But it is very hard to have courage and strength when things don’t go your way.  That is the difference between success and failure and is the reason we play sports in society.  It’s a measure of our ability to adapt and learn what we are made of, whether or not we will cry out for assistance, blame someone else, or look at ourselves in the mirror and grow better, and more hungry.  It is in that process that everything becomes better.  And because of everything I’ve said here about the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, a loss at this stage of their development is something that will burn in those young kids for years and make them veterans able to sustain victory long into the future.  Unfortunately, our society does not apply this lesson to their everyday lives, because if they did, they would find that those lives would improve dramatically.

Rich Hoffman
http://overmanwarrior.wordpress.com/2010/12/04/ten-rules-to-live-by/
http://twitter.com/#!/overmanwarrior
www.overmanwarrior.com

14 Responses

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  1. What a great essay!!!!
    Nice change to see you in your element and pictures of what play is in your world.
    You need not be a fan of football, or any sports to enjoy the story told here. Giving teeth to our current state of the country through the crushing loss of the Bucs is what sets you apart from the same ole’ everyday blogger who hasn’t the depth or the courage to see losing from a whole different perspective.
    Nice!

    Cydvicious

    October 10, 2011 at 12:36 am

  2. You say, “Loses are opportunities to build character.” Me thinks, I must have extra character to spare. I feel as though I’ve been on the losing end of the spectrum most of my life. By that, I mean that my fights have been over issues where I have been far outnumbered by unions and others that have had all to gain and nothing to lose by sticking with “the people in charge.” Those many people who refused to stand up for what they knew was right. In the end they lost because they have proven they have zero character.

    In the case of this essay on Tampa Bay, I love this essay. It is fun to see that “corporate America” can make money and still cater to the whims of the people who DO pay the taxes. After seeing the disgusting display of the demonstrators on Wall Street, it is refreshing to enjoy viewing some of the 99% what love this country and our traditions. Football IS a national “tradition.”

    My team is the University of Michigan. I enjoyed watching Nebraska beating our nemesis, Ohio State, on Saturday night. Stood up and cheered when Nebraska made a major comeback in the second half. Love that beautiful picture of you and W at the game. You should frame that one.

    Sandra

    October 10, 2011 at 4:33 pm

    • People wonder why those of us who fight these things have so much character……well, now you know why. : ) We do have that one framed. I love that place.

      overmanwarrior

      October 10, 2011 at 5:18 pm

  3. [...] offers for their star player in Joey Votto, who is currently the gem of our local baseball team.  He’s the ideal baseball player and we’d all like to see him stay in Cincinnati for his entire c… But in reality, Joey will most likely decline in production over the coming years, and he is set to [...]

  4. [...] I have asked many people, why does you wife have to work? Why do you work such long hours? Why do yo…? Most of the time, the answer is, “I can’t afford it.” But these same people feel they must approve another tax levy so they don’t have to admit that money is short. I’ve actually seen people take on extra jobs just to pay their taxes. [...]

  5. [...] I ask you to join me in supporting Doc’s Law. It’s of epic importance and is a piece of legislation that is needed for the economic vitality of …. Having a speed limit is all about having the ability to tax us in yet another way. It has NOTHING, [...]

  6. [...] view such people simply as slaves. I would not trade one second of my independence with them for financial security which is the reaso…. I would actively seek to bring down and destroy any institution that assists in covering up such [...]

  7. Love your passion for your team! Loved this article, even though I’d rather play sports than sit and watch, Your dedication is admirable.

    NLKM

    November 12, 2011 at 1:13 am

  8. [...] their existence by overreaching their authority in the class-room and among the police authority. Look at the fat-fingered politician who creates legislation due to the union lobby in trade for camp…. Look at the cops on a Saturday night setting up DUI checkpoints to “rid” society of drunk [...]

  9. [...] When I go on vacation in the south, particularly in Florida I relish the giant Confederate Flags tha… They are huge flags that fly proudly and when I see them I don’t think of slavery. Not at all. I think of a people who love freedom and want to be left alone. I think of a people who are openly displaying their willingness to fight at a moment’s notice again if need be, to fight for freedom. When I see the Confederate Flag, I think of a rebel! [...]

  10. [...] It has been a long time since I’ve been able to write anything positive about my favorite football…Raheem could not get his young players focused after loses to those two teams in the middle of the season and the Buc’s finished the rest of the season going from first place to never winning another game the rest of the season. This left the Buc’s needing to fire Morris who had been with the Glazers since he was a very young man. But when you are head coach, and you don’t win, someone has to pay. So the Glazers not only fired Raheem Morris, but every single coach on the football team, not out of meanness, but out of necessity. The press around Tampa Bay has been ablaze with speculation as to who in the world would coach the Buccaneers in the wake of this devastating termination of the entire coach staff. Many of the fans have been very frustrated that the Glazers interviewed so many coaches from the NFL, but committed to none of them. As January ticked away and time was running out panic began to set in from the fan base. They wanted to know who was going to hold the reigns of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and wanted to see how the coaching staff would be rebuilt, and they wanted it quickly. But the Glazers didn’t blink. They held out, they interviewed the held out some more—they interviewed some more, until they finally announced the hiring of Greg Schiano from Rutgers University. The reason I’m a Tampa Bay Buccaneer fan as opposed to any other football franchise is that the Glazers are not afraid to gamble to get exceptional results. This has given them some of the best players in football history, particularly on defense, but some of the best coaches anywhere, many of them still coaching in the NFL. This is because the Buccaneers as an organization put philosophy first and emotion second when they make football decisions, and they use the three basic philosophic axioms to make those decisions, existence, consciousness, and identity. Knowing they were getting old and needed new blood to their philosophy of existence, the Buc’s fired a very good coach in John Gruden to promote Raheem Morris since Morris was being courted by NFL teams all over the country looking for the next Mike Tomblin of the Pittsburg Steelers. The Glazers had lost Tomblin once, and they didn’t want to lose Morris, and since the great defensive coordinator Monte Kiffin was leaving the NFL and head coaching jobs were being dangled in front of Morris the Glazers pulled the trigger, dumped Gruden and gave both jobs to Morris, who went on to be coach of the year shortly thereafter. Morris brought in great young players full of zip and poise, but eventually NFL teams were able to spot Morris’s weakness, his lack of ability to adapt and teach his team the kind of discipline needed to adjust a game plan when it didn’t work and constantly relearn plays to present fresh looks. Once teams figured out the Buccaneer playbook, the Bucs were exposed and could not win another game the rest of the year, and that was Morris’s fault. The Buc’s had lost their identity in the axiom of philosophy. This then affected their consciousness as a team and their ability to win games. Many fans of football think that what wins football games are strictly the X’s and O’s. Many sports analysts will also say such things. But they are wrong. What makes a winner on the football field is the same as what makes a winner in politics, in business, in family relationships, in personal endeavor; it’s having a correct philosophy. The Glazers rather than hire an NFL coach to just come in and win a few more games next year with the same players looked to fix their philosophy in the offseason. They aren’t looking for another quarterback, a free agent linebacker or even new D-backs. The Bucs are looking to fix their philosophy at the most fundamental level. What is the goal of their existence? How do they know they have that existence, which is their consciousness, and what is their identity which unifies those two primary axioms? This is why the Buccaneers as an organization fly that giant flag over the practice field. The Glazers know full well what they are doing. They took a gamble on Morris, it failed, so they abandoned that train of thought not because Raheem wasn’t a great coach, I think he was, but because he wasn’t able to maintain the three axioms of philosophy that the Buccaneer organization is expected to uphold. So the Glazers went out and hired a coach who displayed that he understood what those axioms are. Winning is not about spending money, it’s not about hiring a “has been.” It’s about being ahead of the curve and seeing what sometimes isn’t there yet. So I’m excited about the new hire of Greg Schiano. I am happy to see that someone outside the box is getting a chance to build a philosophy in the Tampa Bay Buccaneers organization that not only reflects the success of the past, but the success that is yet to be. I will continue to fly my Buccaneer flags and look forward to an exciting 2012 season which should be quite exciting. But remember, it’s not just about football, the games we play in life are about strategy and strategy is about winning wars. Whether the wars are ones of blood, ones of politics, or ones of just scores on a board, winning is a philosophy. But the key is in finding the correct philosophy, no matter what the endeavor is. For the Buccaneers, their philosophy isn’t just to win one year or two years, but to have a philosophy of winning consistently. And for us all, winning can sometimes hit us in the face by accident, but winning consistently is a philosophy that must first be identified by knowing our existence, recognizing our consciousness, and rallying being our identity. That is the way of things………………………. To learn what a Overmanwarrior is CLICK HERE: http://overmanwarrior.wordpress.com/2012/01/09/the-overmanwarriors-eating-fighting-and-philosophizing-the-keys-to-a-good-life/ [...]

  11. John Gruden, was never a coach,he took over the best coached team in the NFL. He was the luckies coach! Now Tony Dungy he was blessed,He new how to get the players attention and he got the most out of his players.He coach both the colts and bucs and was very sucessful what has John Gruden ever done.

    patrick leary

    January 7, 2013 at 12:01 pm


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