The Encyclopedia of Ancient Giants in North America: A masterpiece by Fritz Zimmerman

IMG_4354It was a rare treat to come home for the weekend on a Friday and to have a stack of really good books to read on a subject where I had a lot to learn.  My oldest daughter and I had been talking about this problem recently while dining at a very nice restaurant in London—that books were getting harder to read for me as I get older because most of them seem so trite and unimaginative.  I blame the publishing industry on that problem as they continue to put out the same contorted material to fit neatly into the turbulent social conditions of our day—instead of pushing against those limits to actually expand human culture.  But I did manage to find some great books in the literary capital of the world which for me was like a drink of water after walking in the desert for three days.  But the biggest jolt came while I was at the Stonehenge site off to the west of London.  It wasn’t just the stone monuments that had my mind racing—it was the entire area and the way that the English Heritage group had built the new welcome center—which removed the tourists from Stonehenge and put them a mile away giving visitors an excellent overview of the entire countryside.  And to me that countryside felt remarkably like my home in Ohio—so much so that as soon as I returned home I bought three books that I had been thinking about for quite a while—yet didn’t really have the time to give to them.

After my trip to Stonehenge, my mind was racing and I needed more information to connect all the jagged evidence I had been collecting intellectually for more than 40 years.  So I bought the books I wanted from Fritz Zimmerman and they arrived on a Friday and by Monday morning with no sleep to my credit for the weekend, I had read through the one I had most on my mind, his The Encyclopedia of Ancient Giants in North America and the result was simply magnificent.  This is a book that should be sold in every museum in North America and be the go-to reference material for all things related to American archaeology.  It’s a great collection of a newly discovered phenomena that is unlocking our true American history and it does what all great books do and that’s expand the dialogue.IMG_4355

It’s been a long time that I started reading a book on a Friday night and literally didn’t put it down until Monday morning with only a couple of half hour power naps to sustain the necessity for slumber put off until I was finished with the many discoveries shown in the book.  I thought it was a fabulous work constructed with great passion for the subject and it’s a real treasure.  Since all this ancient giant skeleton reporting started breaking reluctantly from the scientific community my best reference for all the material had been scattered internet reports from armchair archaeologists hobbled together from reports cuts from newspapers during the 1800s.  The reason for that is that it was during westward expansion that so many farms were constructed all around the nations and while building new homes, all these mounds were discovered and people would find all these really large bones of human beings who had obviously been in North America for many centuries prior—and the mounds that contained the bones were everywhere.  That’s why the reports exploded during that particular time period but died off at the start of the 20th century. The evidence was pretty much destroyed during all the construction that took place building a new nation, and academia had a line of Christianized dialogue that they wanted to adhere to preserving Europe’s claim to this New World.

Readers here know that I have covered many topics related to these Ohio mound builders from an ancient time that nobody in the orthodox scientific community was able to properly articulate.  For instance, I find it just a little disturbing that right in the heart of downtown Cincinnati on the spot where Fountain Square resides today was a very large mound which took up nearly an entire city block and within it was found the Cincinnati Tablet which is on exhibit at the Museum Center nearby and is an object of a little obsession by me.  That story and the artwork that poured from it do not fit the classical idea of the conquered Indian nomads that we read about in our history books. I have also covered the Mothman mystery from up the river at Point Pleasant.  Additionally I’ve covered the Illuminati exploits of the rich, famous, and politically connected all along the Ohio River and told many stories of mysterious frontier life from the Pennsylvania border all the way to the Mississippi River with the mysterious Cahokia culture and it took a lot of reading and collection of obscure bits of information to put it all together.  Much to my delight, all those topics were covered by Fritz Zimmerman in his books—especially the Encyclopedia of Ancient Giants and it fed my mind in a way that sleep couldn’t.

IMG_4356I think most stunning, and surprising for me was in seeing just how many mound sites with very precise earthworks existed, particularly in Portsmouth, Ohio, West Virginia and on up to Marietta.  I’ve been to many of the sites, but seeing them all in the same book really puts a point on the issue and shows what a vast and complex culture we are dealing with here.  That’s the reason I was so shocked at Stonehenge.  I had wanted to go there for years but just didn’t have the time to get there.  So when the opportunity arose, it was at the top of my list because it always felt like a key to something and the reports I read in my books as a youth were coming from very new assumptions.  But I was clearly able to see that the culture at Stonehenge was precisely the same culture that had built Newark, Serpent Mound and the Miamisburg Mound.  And on that note I was very shocked to learn that a mound the size of the Miamisburg Mound was literally right across the river from my house all covered up in trees near a road I’ve driven down likely a million times yet it’s always been hidden there in plain sight my entire life.  It’s remarkable if it is placed into this larger story.  By itself people just write it off as an old Indian relic, but taken as a portion of a very vast culture all over North America it begins to take on added significance.

Ironically Fritz even had in his Encyclopedia a picture of a Pazuzu which is the winged demon that I had just seen on display at The Louvre in the Assyrian section.  The Pazuzu is the same crazy demon that was supposedly possessing Linda Blair in The Exorcist and may have actually caused trouble on the set.  I had just been thinking when I saw it that ancient relic that it reminded me of pictures I had seen of the Birdman from Cahokian culture over by St. Louis.  As I was reading about the strange reports of mounds found in the Point Pleasant area of West Virginia Fritz made mention that the Shawnee had a name for the mouth of the river, they called it “The River of Evil Spirits” and they had a name for that birdman—they called it Piasu—which is remarkably similar to “Pazuzu.”  That’s when all the gears clicked for me and not only was this the obvious Mothman that had been reported in that particular region made popular by the Richard Greer movie called The Mothman Prophecies, but here was direct evidence that diffusion had taken place from Sumeria to the Ohio Valley which explained why the mathematics and effigies were all so similar.  Right around 3000 B.C. to 800 B.C. which is a very long time—Sumerian culture and North America where trading with each other and likely the British Isles were involved in the commerce—the Shawnee were not indigenous to the Ohio Valley—so they wouldn’t have been directly exposed to that commerce.

They came up out of Florida and picked up legends that had been told for quite a long time and it’s no accident that their word for the great demon is so close to the name that the Sumerians used.  And it’s also no accident that an ancient Sumerian demon happened to be terrorizing West Virginians before a major tragedy there in the late 60s because the same character showed up and was worshiped hundreds of miles downriver at Cahokia.  Whatever bizarre rituals had taken place around the West Virginia mounds had evoked the same paranormal circumstances as were seen on the other side of the world in Sumerian culture.  And just like that, Fritz had connected the dots by showing all the work in one place for all to see.  And don’t fret orthodox science; Fritz doesn’t make supernatural claims about possible quantum fluctuations in reality that might manifest such a demon creature at Point Pleasant.  He simply points out that the names are similar.  Hey, the people of West Virginia saw something there whether it’s illusion or reality—something haunts them at Point Pleasant—still.  And I’ve always wondered about it.

Obviously The Encyclopedia of Ancient Giants in North America is a self-published enterprise and some of the reviews I read on the book prior to buying it criticized it for that case.  I understand self publishing, I’ve been through it myself—because a more traditional publisher is looking for an ROI on their projects and they tend to stick close to a formula they understand, and don’t like to take chances—especially these days with all the costs involved and marketplace changes that have taken place.  Saying that, I do love a well published book and one of the best I’ve seen in a while is Francis Pryor’s masterwork called Britain B.C. Harper Perennial did a fabulous job with it from beginning to end.  You know with a book coming from a top tier publisher that you’re getting great editing and many eyes looking at the manuscript so it’s clean of errors—and I like that.  But I also know that most books through the ages were not published in this fashion.  Most of the time they were done the way that The Encyclopedia of Ancient Giants in North America was—with an author who poured a lot of passion into their project to the point where its infectious and that’s the case with Fritz’s work.  There was no way a big name publisher was going to put their name on a project like this because there is just too much politics and religion in this particular topic—and the only way to break through those barriers is through a self published enterprise.  With that said, I did notice little things that seemed like fragmented thoughts and little format errors here and there—but it didn’t bother me because the essence of the material was so good.  Fritz Zimmerman has spent 15 years putting together all this material, which saved me a boat-load of time doing it on my own.

I’d recommend getting this book even if you are just a little curious.  It’s a jaw-dropping collection of what will be a revolutionary realization regarding North American history.  For instance, as I’ve pointed out in the very good book called 1421: The Year China Discovered America by Gavin Menzies it is highly likely that the Shawnee from Florida were actually migrants from China who assimilated with local tribes and eventually became the Shawnee of Ohio.  As they were “assimilating” and running into what was left over of the mound builders they learned the name of Pazuzu slightly wrong from its original Sumerian roots which came to North America from the British Isles most probably.  And this is why books like Zimmerman’s get ignored by big publishers, because the entire publishing industry is chained to an academic structure that is in extreme denial over the obvious diffusion that took place well before our modern documented history—and they don’t want to be associated with that kind of controversy until they can be assured that they can make money off it.  Right now, this giant species of human that existed in North America before the arrival of Columbus is way too controversial.

We are lucky that Menzies was able to publish his book in a conventional way.  But this information is coming in too fast for academia to contain, so there is a lot of tension in the industry.  That’s why to me it was such a miracle to run into Zimmerman’s book—and why I spent my entire weekend reading it fully—sleepless.  It was a fabulous read and a book I will turn too often for reference.  And it’s the kind of book that should be on every bookshelf because it’s a pioneering work well ahead of its time.  We should all be thankful that Fritz Zimmerman took the time to write it—because it couldn’t have been easy.  That’s for sure.  To really study this kind of topic you have to have vast overwhelming evidence in one place so you can see the big picture—and that’s precisely what Zimmerman has done.  This isn’t some video game where you run across a fantasy driven forgotten cultures like in Uncharted or Zelda, or even a popular novel like Dan Brown’s Da Vinci Code.  This is real and it’s right under our feet—literally.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

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