The British Helped Obama with Spying on Trump: If a tree falls in the forest and nobody hears it–it still fell

Of course the NSA and the British Intelligence are going to deny publicly that they can spy on individuals at the provocation of the President. That’s supposed to be a secret that gives them an advantage over the “bad guys” as they see it.  Most of the testimony that FBI Director Comey gave regarding the Trump wiretap at Trump Tower before the election of 2016 was old language within the intelligence community and the kind of rules that held presidents accountable to the public.  The surveillance done today which Donald Trump phrased as “wiretapping” is much more sophisticated than the type that was commonplace during the 80s and 90s.   These days, as Judge Napolitano explains below, a president has a number of resources to draw from to spy on a rival, or anybody really, and the web of international connectivity among spy agencies is just complicated enough to hide their malice.  So when President Trump accused Obama of spying on him—that is what he was talking about.

However, for that little video Judge Napolitano was suspended from Fox News because likely the good Judge was flying too close to the sun.   The big connection between Fox News and English spies is the news organization Sky News which are both owned by Rupert Murdoch.  Murdoch also has a long history of backing moderates in the Labour Party like Tony Blair, and don’t forget Murdoch was caught up in a major controversy in England over the phone tapping scandal that severely damaged him and his family because they were complicit.  When you play the game at that level and get caught, you have to make deals, which is likely what is behind the suspension of Napolitano for pointing out that British Intelligence likely did Obama a favor and spied on Donald Trump so that the trail would not lead directly to the White House.

Constantly James Comey during his testimony on March 20th 2017 made mention that “there was no evidence that anybody spied on Donald Trump as a candidate in Trump Tower.”  However, and this is very important because Wikileaks has given us the truth—the Democrats from Obama to Hillary Clinton all the way down to the heads of the DNC were actively in the business of destroying evidence.  So if evidence is destroyed or if the crime is done in such a way to cover up a crime as its being committed, like Hillary and her personal server and Obama using British Intelligence to cover the surveillance of a rival candidate—then the law is still being broken.  The age-old question of whether “a tree falls down in a forest but nobody hears it—did it really fall,” dictates that we apply the same logic to this surveillance question.  Yes, if a tree falls, it fell whether or not people hear it.  Taking away the ability of people to hear the tree fall does not stop the tree from falling.  Taking away the ability of the FBI, the CIA, or the NSA from reporting that a crime is committed in spying on a future president does not mean a crime wasn’t committed.  It was, only the facts of the matter have been hidden in plain sight through chaos and political activism for which James Comey is clearly guilty.

Remember this is the same James Comey who played games with the wording of the San Bernardino terrorist attack, by the request of the White House indicating that the terrorism was not an act of a “larger” terrorist cell and that the participants acted alone—even though we know now and then that wasn’t true. This is also the same James Comey who released the crime scene of the terrorist’s apartment to reporters which destroyed countless bits of evidence linking those terrorists to a greater threat.  Then he complained that he couldn’t unlock the iPhone left by the terrorists which as we learned from Wikileaks was another lie—because the technology to unlock the phone had been there all along—they just wanted to act as an activist in forcing the hand of the Apple Company to get on board with data collection on their users.  So we are not talking about a good ol’ Boy Scout in Director James Comey.  The man is highly political.  He fumbled the Hillary Clinton email case and looks to have wanted to hand her the election by calling off the investigation into her days before the election. Then he provided testimony against Trump in front of congress that was obviously biased.  For instance, how could he know the thoughts of the Russians when he said there was no evidence connecting them to the Trump campaign then said they wanted Trump to win and Hillary to lose?  And this is just over the last few years, from December of 2015 to March of 2017.  If there was any justice in the world, Comey would be fired.  I thought he might be a good cop when he investigated Hillary Clinton in July of 2016 but when he kicked the case off to the side in the first weekend of November, he was playing the odds in favor of Hillary Clinton and was using the law to pick winners and losers.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2015/12/16/fbi-san-bernardino-attackers-didnt-show-public-support-for-jihad-on-social-media/?utm_term=.63153786fbb0

So what can you do when you can’t trust the cops, and the legal system behind them? Well, you vote for a new president and you clean house in government positions—like Comey’s.  You also pick media sources to get your information from those who have a track record of honesty in the face of fire, not those who are part of a wide net of corruption as Deep State contributors—like CNN, ABC News and the terrible NBC—people like Judge Napolitano.  When these vile political insurgents destroy evidence so that we can never trace back the intentions of the perpetrators you can tell who is telling the truth by the actions of others when they get caught taking action against someone, such as the suspension of Judge Napolitano for connecting the dots between the White House of Obama, the British spies and Trump which forced Fox News to take action against the one person who put all the dots together—because as a judge used to assembling the facts of a case to apply the scales of justice—the situation was obvious.  But that evidence needed to remain hidden, so punishment was administered and Murdoch agreed to it because of his past accusations by British authorities for wiretapping of his own—in the old-fashioned way.

Yet the media had a field day with the fake news that came from Comey’s mouth, about a Russian government who wanted to make it easy for Trump to win the presidency and declared that there was no evidence Obama ordered wiretapping in Trump Tower. For pointing out the injustice of it all, Trump was called a conspiracy theorist, just as they had called him back in 2012 over Obama’s birth certificate.  But Trump has been proven to be right much more often than the media will admit.  But that doesn’t matter, because Judge Napolitano has a very good record of telling the truth, and I’d be inclined to believe him over James Comey any day.  Because Comey doesn’t have a very good record. I imagine when the guards let the Trojan Horse into Troy one of the guards at the gate were probably like James Comey—sympathetic to the enemy and were admirers of the Horse’s construction.  So they let it in, and Troy fell in siege.  But what we have now that they didn’t have then was someone like Judge Napolitano willing to speak the truth even if it’s not popular and costs him at his job.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

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When Snowflakes Become a Blizzard: Looking for #FindMike, the New York Teacher and child molester

For seven years and under great public scrutiny for even saying it, I’ve pointed out the extreme travesty of our public education system and the unions that control our tax payer funded teachers. For many years prior to my public exhibition—for over twenty years—I had a very loose tongue about the state of our schools for their inadequacies.  Many people didn’t want to hear it and they were angry at me for even pointing it out—for which I haven’t cared even a little bit—because I do not want to live in a world where the snowflakes so evident today—these soft-minded tacos of ideological indecision born in our public education institutions for over two generations are the ones running everything—because they won’t be able to handle it.  They are not equipped, not because they are stupid, or bad people, but because they have had their minds stolen by the thieves of public education—corrupt teachers living under the protection of teacher unions, who are functioning from the most selfish desires imaginable.  Of course, not all teachers are of this kind, but way too many are and every school has their share—and the kids know who they are.  Yet they stay employed because the unions protect them, and if you ever had any doubt dear reader as to what I’ve been telling you for such a long time—watch the following video from Project Veritas seen below.

In the video we see Mitchell Rubinstein—the New York State United Teacher’s Counselor trying to seduce the interviewer by dazzling her with showers of forbidden information—which of course works to our advantage as education reformers. As enlightened as we are supposed to be as a society—and Project Veritas understands this for their important work at uncovering hidden escapades—hot women will get you a lot more information than a wiretap.  Guys and girls will say anything to a pretty face, and that’s what Rubinstein did—he let the goods loose on some teacher in New York named Mike who abused some of his male middle-school students with oral sex and obvious physical abuse.  The only way we know about it is because of Mitchell Rubinstein’s loose lips trying to pick up on the Project Veritas reporter.  The legal system did nothing for the kids and this bastard certainly didn’t do anything to bring justice to the teacher.  The abuse among teachers in public schools is a major problem and nobody has done anything about it for way too long.

The only real solution to the problem is to break up the monopoly that these teachers have over our children. The reason that “Mike” felt entitled to abuse his students was that he was protected by a powerful union and by a law where kids are forced into his classroom for his consumption.  If the kids don’t go to his school they’ll go to another one where someone like “Mike” is waiting.  The other teachers never say anything because many of them have their own demons—that’s why they are teaching and not doing in the world.  They spew out this crap that they want to “teach others to be better people” but in reality, they typically are timid types afraid of the world—so they hide in academia.  That’s fine for basic instruction, but we are crazy if we allow such people to command our futures without competitive involvement.  Teachers like this “Mike” child molester need competition from the free market.  When there are rumors of such “Mikes” as there always are, parents should have the ability to leave that school for another one and take their money with them.  The school, no matter where it is or what its reputation, should not have dominion over the children that attend there only to be victims to people like “Mike,” which is what has been happening.

The reason that nobody ever does anything about such rumors of child molesting teachers who abuse their students is because it’s so hard to fire or discipline a corrupt teacher. And by watching Mitchell Rubinstein who is pretty high up on the social totem pole—it is obvious that the intellect of these people is not very robust.  As I reported earlier, Rubinstein was bragging about this “Mike” situation to impress “chicks” by his own admission.  What a low-quality person—yet these are the people we are supposed to value—and throw limitless funds at to support.  No wonder our kids are so stupid these days.  It’s not so much their fault—its idiots like this Rubinstein guy and his client “Child Molesting Mike.”

I know by saying this stuff that its inconvenient, and that the trends of the day say to just play along to get along. But, I’m not willing to do that.  I don’t want to deal with all these idiot kids in my old age who are such pathetic snowflakes that they don’t have basic grips on reality because their educations were so terrible, and in some cases they were the victims of abuse themselves at the hands of some teacher like “Mike” at some point in their past.

Recently while my wife and I were in London she was absolutely horrified at several advertisements for sex dance clubs in that city that are becoming quite popular. These are different dance clubs than we all went to as kids in our 20s—at these you don’t just dance close and sometimes grind on each other, you actually have sex in front of everyone—completely uninhibited. And while we were down in the Tube on a Friday night where many of these people were packed like sardines into those underground transportation devices going from club to club I saw some of them—dressed for the act.  It was horrifying to my wife and she just didn’t get it.  I had to explain to her that most of these kids in London came from homes where there were high divorce rates and there were obviously sexual experimentation going on in their lives way too early, whether it came from a trusted adult—who had let them down, or some peer they grew up with.  By the time they were 21 years of age they were not looking to have children yet as housing prices were prohibitively too high, and the prospect of a family just out of the scope of consideration.  And their educations had been teaching them that loose sex with any gender was perfectly fine for many years so here was a bunch of young people piled into a dance club together not looking for serious relationships that lead to buying a house and raising a family—they just wanted to satisfy a primal urge so that they could get back to their Playstations or new Nintendo games which is what they really wanted to do with their time.  Those poor stupid kids will be train-wrecks as adults because the shame of what they’ve done will follow them for the rest of their lives when biologically they do desire to settle down and build a good life with someone.

In a valueless society taking care of a primal urge so that a person can do other things they’d rather be doing is a default mode of conduct.  But the cause is in destroying those values to begin with, and our education systems around the world are at fault.  Letting molesters like “Mike” into our schools harms our children by exposing them to things they shouldn’t even know about until they are well in their teenage years.  But the kids molested by “Mike” didn’t have a choice.  An authority figure abused his power and had kids come to his house and he made them perform oral sex—then this teacher union representative Mitchell bragged about it so that he could get laid by the Project Veritas reporter.

What a bunch of losers, but never ever say I didn’t tell you all about it before. This just confirms what I’ve always said—and that demands action on your part.  This is something none of us can afford to turn away from.  It deserves our highest priority as a society.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

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5 thoughts on “The Virtue of Material Acquisition and Spending Money: Defying thousands of years of wrongly framed thinking”

  1. Welcome home. Thanks for sharing your adventures. I enjoyed it. And this blog is right on. I like to mention to my friends who talk about God’s will that God made us in his image and he wants us to USE our minds to advance… that usually gives those who think some pause and some appreciation for those of us who enjoy using our “God Given” talents to acquire things that we want and value. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. Keep it up.

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  2. Thanks Mike. These are difficult concepts for a lot of people and travel does help sort through things by coming out of a comfort zone to provide new observations. And there is no place like America! That’s for sure.

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  3. Very Interesting.
    I definitely see your side and have always bought what we wanted but always with cash. No payments. We have a nice house, 10 cars including a vette, a farm and 18 other properties in different states. (investment)
    All payed for. My sister lives in the UK so I know what you’re experiencing.
    Since my parents came home from Florida and caring for them, I have a serious new appreciation for what it will take for retirement and that’s if you’re healthy! We were thinking 4 million. It’s always been our goal. We are WAYY off! And with this screwed up healthcare, it’s harder to gauge.
    You’re young. I have 9 years on you. As you get older (and after your 50’s) things move at lightening speed. You’ll process differently after 55. I’ve had conversations with friends and they did as well. I suppose it’s a wonderful natural progression. My husband is also a financial genius, but we curved our wants for the future a couple years back. We are completely happy and financially solid, until we’re not. That’s universal.
    Our strategy has always been to buy things that will value us later.
    As for the Iphone….I don’t want to own anything smart. I don’t have a smart meter anymore )i payed dearly for that), got rid of my Samsung smart phone, no smart car, no smart gun, refrigerator, thermostat, or anything else like that. Unlike others, my life is more interesting and better without those things.

    Keep it simple~

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    1. You are still a young woman, and you’re right about retirement. I wouldn’t even think about it with less than $10 million dollars in the bank and not spoken for anywhere. Because the health care costs are just out of control. Ridiculous!

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  4. I meant to mention because it’s important to my point…that I have complete POA of my parents financial and medical. We do not pay a dime as of now to care for them. But handling all of their affairs is a real eye-opener and an experience most children don’t get. He did a great job of providing for themselves, but you have to make sure those investments keep paying. Very scary and completely changed our strategy.
    Another difference is that we’ve been savers…always. As have they. Most people my age have not. Even scarier.
    Mind your pennies and the dollars will take care of themselves.
    True that!

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The Two Ingredients All Successful Societies Must Have: Guns and Books

As I spoke yesterday about the faults of James Comey’s speech on personal security within the United States now I feel I must identify the real answer to what is required for a free society.  I’ve been working out this little problem for a while now and it really took my recent trip to Europe for me to confirm with more than theory the proper contents of what it takes to have a self-governed society functioning healthily in a constitutional republic.  As I’ve said before on other topics, I wish sometimes that life could be so simple for me to have one solitary occupation which I could throw myself into that I could say—I am this—or that.  Such as someone who works as an engineer might say upon introductions—“I’m so and so and I’m an engineer,” my life is a lot more complicated.  And if given the opportunity to be a historian I would do it, because I have an unnaturally complicated relationship with history.  I pursue it for fun and often find myself thinking about it all hours of the day.  Given that, I know much more about history than the average person, so when I say that the two big drivers of misery in Europe throughout the Dark and Medieval ages was the absence of personal protection—weapons—and the ability to read—I would be saying specifically how we can solve these problems going forward and take mankind off the track of the Vico cycle which has plagued us all for tens of thousands of years.  With those two elements absent from those historic societies—for which much of the known world of today is based—battles between church and state dominated the lives of everyone leaving individuality to sacrifice itself to national security many times over.

One thing that astonished me about the many English people who I met during my travels was how literate they were and proud of it.  They like to read in England and they should, the concept was born there.  It’s only been fairly recently that the printing of individual books was even possible for common people.  It was from 1400 AD to really the reign of King Henry VIII that Bibles were printed for individual consumption bringing the word of God to every household and leaving the Church to feel very insecure about their ability to usher mankind through the gates of Heaven for the good of the State.  I felt quite privileged to walk among the ruins of various monasteries in England, such as the great St. Augustine’s Abby because in 1536 AD they were destroyed out of a need for money by the regime.  That left the monks who had previously provided all the intellectual work of translating the scripture to the people who attended their churches to be the symbols of thinking in the medieval world.  After destroying the various monasteries, a power vacuum occurred and the Reformation effort spread as people started to question the relationship between an often corrupt Roman Catholic Church clergy, the various kings, and God.  By the time the first Welsh Bible was published in print during 1567 a lot of discussion regarding the Mathew’s Bible printed in 1537 had taken place.  King Henry VIII was very anxious about letting the lower orders of society read the Bible for themselves because it had severe political and social consequences.

It was only a few years later that Robert Cushman commissioned the Mayflower to flee to America to escape the church’s ever increasing losing grip on the “commoners” such as what happened in Canterbury quite explicitly as Henry’s children struggled with the social changes that reading Bibles had introduced to their society.  This explosion of thought advanced to the days of the pirates over the next hundred years as the exploits of the great Henry Morgan came back to England from the Caribbean region as countries used privateers to rob other countries of the loot they were stealing from the Meso American region.  Democracy was invented on pirate ships as they were functioning governments far removed from the countries of their origin and mankind was turned loose for the first known time in the history of the world—and writers like John Locke were there to record the observations for people like Thomas Jefferson and Ben Franklin to expand upon later.  Secret societies like the Illuminati and the Scottish Rites developed a line of philosophy divorced from the English crown as the publication of books began to create a new kind of human being among the would-be intellectuals who could afford books that in previous centuries were either monks or members of the king’s court.

During the 1750s those inspired by the new books of Europe to flee to America to live as frontiersman erupted into westward expansion.  During the years of the French and Indian War then eventually the Revolutionary War—then the War of 1812, then the Civil War the full fruition of knowledge shared through books were matched with the possession of personal firearms which allowed for the kind of self-reliance that Ralph Waldo Emersion and his friend Henry David Thoreau contemplated as Transcendentalists.  It is important to remember that as of all the events that lead to the Civil War in America books had only been present for reading among human populations for about 250 years.  Personal books were not available outside of state-run institutions until this present time and it was books that led to the explosion in even contemplating individual liberty.

It was all the way up to the beginning of the 20th Century that personal firearms were the keys to American life.  After all, frontiersman and cowboys were able to hunt and forge a life for themselves anywhere in the world so long as they had a gun and a Bible to read by the firelight to their families to pass the time—and human consciousness expanded rapidly.   The American Indian didn’t have a chance against these European escapees armed with personal firearms and the knowledge they had acquired from books printed in New England and shipped west to markets emerging along the many rivers of the new nation.  Indians were a collective based society and they were much like the oriental forces that had been crushed under the expanding French and English empires that were dominating the world driven not by the great military leaders of Napoleon and the likes Wellington—but of those societies having access to the ability to read for the first time.  They were smarter than their opponents and the North American Indian may have been living in accord with nature, but mankind was conquering nature through contemplation derived by reading—and the Indians lost because they couldn’t think as individuals.  Reading is a very individual oriented type of activity.

That gave birth to the American Western—of the cowboy gunslinger, which represented to the world something new—an individual human being protected by their gun and functioning as a self-reliant entity that didn’t need a church for their spiritual awakening—because they could read—and they didn’t need a government to protect them because they had a gun.  It was those two things that created the American cowboy and which eventually led the rest of the world to contemplating personal liberty.  As of the present, the world has not yet accepted the superior philosophic position of the American gunslinger because there is a lot more to it than just having the ability to take the life of another human being, or being able to read a book on their own without the interpretation of a church clergy to tell them what it said.   This is why socialist statists deeply concerned about this wave of personal freedom happening in American like Barack Obama were so weary about the electorate holding on to their “God and their Guns.  They know that it is those two elements that prevented a society from falling in behind the old European model where political elites controlled the commoners through ignorance and superior might.  Modern progressives desire deeply to take society back to the time right before Henry VIII where people could be managed between the church and the state which is why they support so vehemently the introduction of Islamic radicalism into Europe and America because they desire to use that religion to reduce intellectual capacity and drive society back to a theocracy instead of an intellectual republic without central controls.  That is also why liberals are all about gun control regardless of what the stats say on the matter.

It is therefore the ability to read and the ability to own a personal firearm and even to carry it around with you that decentralizes all governments and puts the power truly into the people—and it’s really a new idea which has only flowered in America.  As I said, the English people are very literate and that was refreshing.  But they don’t have guns, and so as a result they still live much the way they did during the Middle-Ages. Currently it’s not the Catholic Church or even the monarchy which drives their society, but their history in those activities still bind their society to that foundation just as Japan still fashions itself to their samurai period.  That leaves them all with one ingredient toward personal freedom, but not the other.

Only in America and only with both the gun and the books of our culture has freedom advanced.  America actually is on over saturation because not only do we have books, but we have 1000s of channels of cable television, 100 years of motion pictures to watch, endless books and countless things to entertain ourselves with—so literacy isn’t as high of a priority as it should be in our society—but there is no way to go back.  Mankind will never surrender their freedoms back to the security of state-run centralized society such as those envisioned by Henry VIII’s friend Thomas More in his book Utopia.  Those days are gone forever because just the act of reading a book like Utopia, or The Communist Manifesto, lead eventually toward a human mind craving freedom.  It’s the Catch 22 for progressives who want to revert back to a theocracy they control whether it is Islam or environmentalism that is worshipped.  Human beings once they get a taste for it won’t go back and if you look at history, you can see clearly a trajectory of thought that leaves us either destroying ourselves or settling space—but we won’t go back.  And societies around the world will not advance on just books and knowledge alone.  They have to allow for personal firearms in order to truly unleash the potential of the human beings in their societies.  You cannot have the good intellectual stuff that comes from a free society without doing the things it takes to have a free society and owning personal firearms is just as important as literacy.  And those are the facts.  You need two things to have a society of free people thriving in a country—any country—they have to be literate with plenty of books and a desire to read them, and they must have guns—lots and lots of them.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

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The Real Problem with Illegal Immigration: Changing what people are running from in the first place

It was an interesting interview between Fox News host Tucker Carlson and Univision News anchor Jorge Ramos because it exhibited quite wonderfully the problem over illegal immigration. When Carlson asked—“do I not have a right to not like that the country does not look like the one I grew up in” he asked a very powerful question.  Of course Ramos exhibited the modern George Soros open border viewpoint that the United States is changing and that these are facts of life that we should all just accept.  But the real essence to the question is not whether or not America should look like a particular color of people—but that the idea of America be preserved no matter who the majority ethnic group might be—because the function of any people in moving to the United States over the last 400 years—likely much longer—was to get away from something to live better in North America.  However, open border advocates assume that when people come to America through illegal and legal immigration that those new people have a right to bring the culture they are running from with them—and that just isn’t the case.

If an immigrant is coming from Venezuela, Nepal, Vietnam, India, Columbia, Mexico—or anywhere that has had their economy destroyed by communism and socialism—they do not have a right to bring that garbage into America to change the nature of our country. The situation is not one of skin color, or even sex—it’s all about the values that make up a society.  America works as a capitalist nation and those coming to the United States for opportunity must respect that opportunity and they can’t bring the garbage they are running from with them.  That is the essence of the immigration argument.  People coming from someplace else have an obligation to assimilate to where they are going.  They don’t have a right to change the nature of the American idea.

I know far more immigrants than I do people from Appalachia America—or in other words I know many more people who are not of white skin color than I do those of my own skin color, and I like those people because often they have good families and strong personal values. But I’m clear with them that I will respect them so long as what they want in life is to work hard and live the American dream.  However, if they start voting for socialists in America and seek to turn our nation into some third world armpit of communism—then I have a problem with them.  It has nothing to do with the color of their skin or their country of origin.

Additionally, I was just able to travel through Europe and I have seen firsthand the trouble I have been reading about and watching on the news for years. Europe is under siege from the former communist block of east European countries and the communist insurgency injected into the Middle East during the 1970s—which is hiding behind the religion of Muslim faith to penetrate the “west” for revenge over Sykes Picot and the centuries long battle of the first Crusades.  Muslims are pouring into Paris and London at an alarming rate not to assimilate—but to change those great European cities from the inside out—and they have been attempting to do the same in America.

Unfortunately for open border advocates like Ramos there isn’t much Mexican history to go on to justify their society as a long-established entity. When there are claims that Texas was taken from Mexico or that there are open disputes along the border into Arizona and elsewhere the truth is that the Spanish conquered the Aztecs in 1519 and sacked the Mayan civilization around the same time—as well as the Incan Empire in South America.  The Spanish looted all the treasure of those cultures and hauled them back to Europe leaving the French and English to fight over what was left—leaving Mexico, Central America and South American depleted and destroyed.  The Spanish mixed with the beaten Aztec and Mayan people creating the people we see today and socialism replaced their former great economy under the Aztec Empire into one of a welfare state centered on Marxist ideas.  So what does Mexico, Central America or any country in South America have to bring to the United States but ideas that would collapse our economy because the people born of those regions were created under the flag of conquest?  We aren’t living in a world where everybody gets a trophy.  In North America, the Indians were beaten in the war over land.  So the rights go to the victor.  In Mexico, the people were beaten.  They don’t get rights to live equally in a world against a culture built on superior ideas.  And that is the problem for people like Ramos.  Admitting that the United States is a superior culture is something that nobody is willing to accept—yet there is a reason that people are willing to put themselves into danger to come to America in the first place—and those reasons need to be respected—and protected.  In order for those people to have opportunity in America the preservation of what makes America special must be preserved.

Mexico never had their act together—they were built from a culture of conquest and pillaging—and they never got their feet set as a country of ideas from the time the Aztecs were beaten to the present—over 500 years later. That’s not something to celebrate.  If anything, Mexico should be taking notes from America—not pouring into North America to bring socialism to our economy to turn it into the backwoods armpit that Mexico is presently.  Mexico could be great, but under the current conditions, it is terrible and I feel sorry for the people imprisoned there.  If they want to become United States citizens—I’m happy to welcoming them—but they aren’t allowed to destroy our culture in the process.

The North American Indian was not native to America—that falsehood was perpetuated by lazy science not willing to accept new discoveries made over the last 150 years that declare pre-Columbian archaeology had a much more advanced culture than what we typically associate with the nomads discovered by Columbus. And the same in Mexico, the Aztecs and whatever culture built the pyramids at Teotihuacan were far more advanced than the Spanish conquistadors who settled in the area and looted that culture into the despots we have now in that region.  If open border advocates wish to acknowledge those historical aspects, then they might get some historical agreement from people like me.  But they are defending conquered countries and insisting that the European translation of history serve as the backdrop of migration justification.  For instance, the slave trade in America was a European inheritance that was eventually eliminated as a result of our American Revolution—but Europe committed far worse atrocities when they looted Central and South America of its former wealth—yet that is never discussed.  But the evidence is still present in the people of today and they flee to America looking for hope and opportunity—but bring with them all the troubles they are trying to flee from.  That is not a sane option.

Understanding all that, Europe is falling apart, Russia doesn’t even have an economy that exceeds the one American company like Apple, China is a communist nation, and Japan is struggling with debt and limited resources—who in the world can save the rest of it from their long histories of bad decisions currently holding down many people from living good lives. Is the answer to let all the world into America as immigrants so to topple the last free and just place on earth—or should the rest of the world take notes from the United States and start forming their cultures around what works in our nation?  If open border supporters like Jorge Ramos really want to save their people in Mexico, Central America and into South America than how about proposing that those counties become more like America and embrace a capitalist form of economy abandoning what they have been doing which is causing so much misery.  We can’t let the world bring communism and socialism into America and expect it to remain a place of hopes and dreams—because those immigrants will just turn our cities into the slums they are running from by nature—because they haven’t changed their patterns of behavior.  Rather, those immigrants should in most cases stay put and adopt American ideas in the Middle East, in Mexico, in all of South America—India—Indonesia—Vietnam—everywhere so that opportunity could be found in their own backyard and not halfway around the world under illegal conditions.  The real issue is that these places that immigrants are fleeing from should change their ways so people aren’t so eager to leave.  That should be the concern of Jorge Ramos—because only when you fix that problem will everything else snap into place.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

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Whispers from the Catacombs of Canterbury: The great work of the Time Team and B.C. trade between America and England

img_4188One of the wonderful discoveries I made while in the United Kingdom recently was the great archaeology that had been done over a fifteen year period by the Time Team.  They had managed to host  television shows featuring very aggressive digs over three-day periods at various sites around England, and elsewhere and putting them on television in an entertaining way.  Working fast as they did, the Time Team has managed to do an enormous amount of research that has culminated in tremendous work in England in understanding their pre-history cultures, the Vikings, Anglo Saxons, Romans, Normand’s, and the relatively recent Victorian Age settlements to better assemble a history of England that nobody really understood prior.  Personally the most explosive example of the Time Team’s value to the United Kingdom was the work they did in Canterbury as seen below.

My son-in-law is from that region so it had been a goal of ours to visit his homeland and get to know the elements of that place which helped shape him into the fine young man that he is now.  When I first met him I was happy to learn that he was from Canterbury because Canterbury Tales was one of my favorite classic pieces of literature.  Along with James Joyce’s Finnegan’s Wake, Canterbury Tales was one of those really hard books I pushed myself to read while living on campus at the University of Cincinnati in what I would call my days of breaking free of society’s intellectual shackles.  Nobody was doing things like that when I was 25 freely reading those great works of literature while eating my breakfast, lunch and dinner almost every day in the Perkins at Coryville just to the east of the main campus of the University of Cincinnati.  Now people did read them because their literature professors gave them homework assignments to do so, but nobody did it for fun, like I did.  Even though I had a car in those days, most of my time was spent walking between the apartment I was staying at and that Perkins reading my books, such as Canterbury Tales.  So it was quite odd for me that my daughter had out of all places in the world meet a young man from Canterbury and was intent to marry him.

Fast forward 25 years into the future from the time that I was readying Canterbury Tales at that Perkin’s restaurant in a college campus environment to doing nearly the same thing in Canterbury itself this time not just reading classic literature in a studious setting, but seeing the places where Thomas Beckett was actually slaughtered and visiting the pubs and inns that were put on the map because of the pilgrimages to Canterbury Cathedral to visit the tomb of the slain archbishop who had fallen out of political favor with Henry II.  Because the intent of the visit to Canterbury was to visit my son-in-law’s family and see how he grew up, we were staying in a flat in the 4th most expensive city in all of England just one street over from the Canterbury West train station.  It was the closest thing I had come in over two decades to living the “college kid” lifestyle that I had when I first read Canterbury Tales—and it was strange.  We actually lived in Canterbury as opposed to staying at a hotel.  At our flat we lived like we would at home doing laundry, preparing meals, and conducting life in general outside the mode of being on vacation.  There is quite a difference.  Over the course of February my wife and I discovered our favorite shopping spots for getting food and we developed a nice relationship with the pizza place directly across from the Westgate Towers—because we ate a lot of pizza.  Canterbury became a second home for us.

However, for the part of me who would have loved to have been an archaeologist if I could put my other interests and career paths in some other order—Canterbury was like living in a dig site.  With their long history of prehistoric people who were conquered by the Romans, the Anglo Saxons, then the Normans—before being dominated by Catholicism, the history of this particular city was extraordinary and something that I soaked up like a sponge.  Not to mention that it was just a short walk from our flat where the pilgrims began their journey to America—so there was plenty of history to investigate and that’s what my wife and I spent most of our time doing around Canterbury.  After reading so much about the place for such a long period of time I was finally able to put my eyes on the real things and touch history as it was—which for me was very satisfying.

Canterbury is a microcosm of what I think has happened to the rest of the world.  In the macrocosm of modern history wars have defined our understanding of things and caused a very shallow recollection of our roots toward civilization.  But the world is just too big and our sciences are too slow to truly get to the roots of things.  For instance, the Time Team tried to do a similar show in America on PBS but they just couldn’t get it off the ground.  America is a different audience and things are spread out differently.  And in regard to our mound culture in the States everything is protected by the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA).  So archaeology has become nearly impossible in America for that very reason making it so that there isn’t any quick study over three days of the most ancient mysteries so obvious to American audiences, like Cahokia, the Newark Mound complex and Serpent Mound.  But the Time Team wasn’t so constrained in the United Kingdom and what they were able to unlock in a relatively short period of time was short of extraordinary.  That left a lot to explore for a guy like me in Canterbury and I relished it immensely.

There were in Canterbury several mounds that I could see on an ancient map of the city dating back to the Romans,  burial mounds all over the place just the same as were found in Stonehenge and in the United States at Fort Ancient and they all date back to the same periods.  I saw physical evidence of two large ones, one at the St. Augustine’s Abby and another right next to the old Roman walls that was as tall as the Miamisburg Mound.  Archaeologists in the area attributed that mound to the Romans who moved into the area, but because of my history with the mounds of Ohio, I would associate it as being before the Romans and for the same reasons.  I think the Romans put their imprint on the mounds they found in Canterbury, but I don’t think they initiated them.  But what was astonishing was that they were there—part of the history of Canterbury and its many microcosm layers of history were there for all to see focused on that one point in the world.  There are very few places anywhere that so much history could be observed in such a preserved way in a relatively confined space.  What made Canterbury unique was that it was the target for many civilizations to make their mark as opposed to building cities here and there within twenty miles of each other.  At Canterbury each big revolutionary period of human consciousness along the present Vico cycle was layered on top of each other for future archaeologists such as the Time Team to reveal to the world in a glorious television production which contributed immensely to our understanding of these periods.

The Time Team would go on to write several very important books on archaeology namely Fancis Pryor’s Britain BC and Tim Taylor’s Guide to the Archaeological Sites of Britain and Ireland.  I picked up Tim’s book at the St. Augustine’s Abby site and I found Pryor’s book at Stonehenge which both made my entire trip worth it alone.  These are books that you can find online, but not as easy as you might think in the States because the two cultures just don’t work well together intellectually.  What Pryor has been doing is similar to the very independent work of Fritz Zimmerman in America but schools of thought haven’t yet put two and two together.  But that’s part of the fun of discovery.  Zimmerman is dealing with a political culture in the States that is using laws the way the Catholic Church imposed its will on private citizens to control thought and history in Canterbury for at least five centuries strongly and another five modestly—but now the Time Team finds itself in a unique place where the politics in England is conducive to archaeology because of the various progressive elements that are trying to rot away the foundations of the Church to overthrow their current society.  So for the members of the Time Team, they went to work in a short period of time and are continuing to do fantastic work which has expanded the historic knowledge of Canterbury and the surrounding English countryside.

One thing I did notice at Stonehenge was that there were many archaeologists working on the site presently as they had their cars, campers and tents set up away from the tourist areas.  In America it is rare to see this kind of aggressive investigation simply because universities have not made it a priority and the politics of the times have not been friendly toward investigation.  We really need to fix that in America because we could use our own version of the Time Team.  But after visiting Canterbury and seeing many things up close that I have long been curious about, I am more convinced than ever that the cultures of prehistory Canterbury and southern, central and western England were actively working with cultures in North America through sea trade that was much more advanced than anyone has previously committed true scientific thought to as of yet.

I am grateful for the chance to have gone to Canterbury having all the great work that the Time Team and many others have contributed so that my time as a born again college kid living on the campus of that ancient city could wander around the streets with my notebooks, books, and camera validating in the microcosm something that interests me greatly on the macro.  The evidence was there for everyone to see and it was fixated on that spot because for the western world, it was the cradle of civilization.  Literature by Geoffrey Chaucer first drew my eye to Canterbury and my daughter’s marriage to one of its sons was the second, but before these events Canterbury was already ancient and laced with a deep history that was covered by time and only unearthed by human ambition through war and profit.  And that made eating pizza across from the Westgate Towers much more meaningful and mysterious as the echoes of the past came to me uniquely through the circumstances of authentic living for just a short time in an ancient place dying to tell its story on a global scale through whispers in the wind and ghosts from its catacombs.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

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Socialism is Destroying The Louvre: Capitalism is the best way to preserve art and history

For a museum that opened in 1793 and had been used as a personal residence of King Francis I and many others after him serving around 10 million visitors a year and is one of the most celebrated of its kind in the world, I had high expectations for The Louvre in Paris. I love museums, I absolutely adore the one in Cincinnati which I visit several times a year called The Museum Center.  However, I have always assumed that places like The Louvre were far superior—after all, when one thinks of Paris they think of two things, the Eiffel Tower and The Louvre so my pilgrimage to that historic museum was something I had thought about for decades.  Perhaps it was because I had been spoiled by the various Heritage sites across the English Channel in England.  My wife and I are members of English Heritage which gives us free access to important historic sites all over England from Stonehenge to Dover Castle and everything in between.  Even relatively small sites like St. Augustine’s Abbey in Canterbury have wonderful museums that go along with their preservation sites.  I had spent a week leading up to my visit to The Louvre visiting Heritage sites and spending a lot of time at the British Museum in London—and I have to say, I was in heaven.  They were so wonderfully organized and put together and the literature they offered was immense and provided me with years of reading.

Yet when I arrived at The Louvre I was greeted with chaos and socialist mayhem. Let me begin by saying that if The Louvre had been in the United States, it would be the greatest attraction in the world, including Disney World.  The building itself was immaculate, stunning even.  And the museum collection acquired under Napoleon rivaled anything else in the world.  It was remarkable.  The combination of contemporary design with the ancient was everything I hoped it would be.  But the main problem with The Louvre was that it is being operated by socialists who have no idea what they are doing.  They have this wonderful museum with all these people coming to it—but they literally have screwed up every aspect of the enterprise starting at the front gate.

My family arrived surprised to see an hour-long line outside the pyramid. We naturally assumed that this was the line to purchase tickets. So we stood in the cold needing to use the restroom for just a little over an hour only to find out that the line we were in was just for security.  The Louvre had enough visitors on a Wednesday afternoon at lunch time to populate a football stadium in the United States, yet the security forced everyone to go through two lines of airport like security which took forever.  Everyone understands that The Louvre is a target for terrorist attacks, but they should have at least had 7 to 8 security lines to properly handle all the museum visitors.  By the time we all got through security we all had to use the restroom—badly.  One of the worst things in France is that they don’t know how to give people places to use the restroom.  They have these ridiculous public restrooms on the sidewalks that hardly work.  Every time I tried to use one it malfunctioned and the seat would come up and the door would come up to the outside letting everyone in the world see you.  So we didn’t use those.  I thought we were in luck by the major tourist attraction of Notre Dame.  We followed the signs to the “toilets” only to go down a series of steps to find a group of east Europeans sitting in a group behind a steel cage charging 1 Euro to go through turnstile just to use the restroom.  So guess what, we turned around and decided to wait until we got to The Louvre thinking it would be like the Museum Center in Cincinnati—and would have like rows of places to use the restroom.  By the time we arrived in that hour long line, we had to go badly and it was almost unbearable by the time we got through security.  There certainly wasn’t any place to go in the courtyard around the pyramid.  Now that we were through security we rushed to the restrooms before buying tickets and found a line there too—especially for the women.

I told my family that I’d step into the men’s room, use the restroom, then I’d get our tickets. By the time I got through that line I thought the girls would have a chance to get through that massive women’s line.  Now keep in mind that this was a Wednesday afternoon in February.  It wasn’t Saturday in the middle of the summer.  For a museum of this size, there was no way there should be lines like what we saw at The Louvre.  Going into the restroom it was pandemonium, and there were as many women in there as men.  It was sheer chaos.  And there were only four urinals.  I managed to use one and did as I said and went to stand in another line to get admission tickets.  After standing in lines for over two hours we had our tickets and were ready to see the museum.  My wife and daughter gave up on the women’s restroom not moving at all for over twenty minutes and used the men’s room under the guidance of my son-in-law.  That solved one problem, now we had another one, we needed to eat.

The plan was always to eat at The Louvre so we didn’t stop at any of the many little restaurants on our way. We figured we grab a bite to eat, spend about 10 minutes eating it, then we’d get into the museum and get to work.  But no, they had only like three restaurants and all of them had half hour lines.  My wife and I managed to get some food as my daughter and her husband waited for an additional 15 minutes to get the same type of food.  The food itself was pretty good, but the means to get it was horrendous.  The employees were slow and unmotivated.  They didn’t care how big the crowds were, they weren’t getting into any kind of hurry.  Service in France is just unfathomably terrible.  Nobody cares about anything and everyone just exists.  And at The Louvre, customer service was not a priority.

Once we got through all that we enjoyed the museum, but the way the experience started put a bad taste in our mouth. If The Louvre had been in America there would have been about 10 restaurants all around the grand room and plenty of seating and bathrooms. Getting tickets for a museum, using the restroom and obtaining food should be easy things for such a large tourist attraction so that visitors could spend their time learning and doing things.  But under the socialist country of France, they even managed to screw up a slam dunk of a great tourist attraction, and turn it into sheer misery.

The whole thing told the story of why socialism is so terrible and how capitalism services society so much better.  Even in England they get it, the Heritage people understand how they make their money to offer services to a public which funds the preservation of art and history.  But The Louvre, they are missing millions of dollars of opportunities and are just living off their reputation—which won’t last forever.  They need approximately ten times the bathroom capacity and that much equally in restaurant availability.  They certainly have the room for it, but obviously not the business sense.  If I were running The Louvre I’d seek out a partnership with McDonald’s—someone who knows how to serve massive amounts of customers quickly.  I’d also bring in other American fast-food chains who are just as good—obviously, the French don’t know how to do that on their own and I’d set them all up on some of those blank walls in the main area under the pyramid outside of the ticketing area.

It isn’t cool to provide bad service, and it certainly doesn’t place people above the bourgeoisie of society to drag ass everything.   Bad service is just disrespectful and it says to visitors of The Louvre that the management doesn’t give a rat’s ass if anyone visits or not.  And from what I saw, The Louvre really doesn’t care if anyone comes.  They think they are entitled to the business and they think that because there really isn’t much else to do in Paris except visit museums that they’ll get by with this kind of thing for the foreseeable future.  But I’m sure I’m not the only visitor to The Louvre to come away feeling disenchanted by their terrible service.   They have a lot of lessons to learn, and for their own sake, they better start learning them.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

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The White Cliffs of Dover: Embracing adventure even when its not convenient

It was something that I had always wanted to see so when the opportunity came up to hike the White Cliffs of Dover at the point where France was closest to the United Kingdom I seized it. I knew when I was doing it that it was a unique opportunity not so much for the event in itself, but because my great photographer daughter was with me and was primed for a little adventure that she was feeling deprived of simply due to the realities of adult life.  As a little girl we did this kind of thing all the time, but now we don’t get to see each other in this way very much because we are all busy adults.  We get time together during a typical week to grab a bite to eat or go somewhere into town—but for adventures where we get to chase dreams, ideas, and the specter of “big thinking” there just aren’t many opportunities that allow for such things as grown-ups living different lives and raising families of their own.  When my kids were little I was able to set the pace because I was the parent, now they are parents of their own and have spouses who have things they want to do and see so things get pretty complicated sometimes just to do simple things together.  But, here my oldest daughter and I were in England together and everyone but us were tired from our previous visit to Dover Castle where the February temperature had dropped and a bank of cloudy fog had moved in choking off the rays of the sun into a dreary canopy that was freezing the other members of our group.  But my daughter—the professional photographer that she is couldn’t resist to get some shots for her portfolio that included the nearby cliffs, but also the light of the deep fog bank.  So we left our other members at the car and went for what we thought would be a 30 minute walk. We didn’t return until two and a half hours later.  Here is a shortened video version of our hike down to the beach of the White Cliffs of Dover.

We were able to see our destination before the heavy fog rolled in so we had an idea where we were going before we really committed to the area. What surprised me was how vast everything was, because in England most things especially in the cities were so small.  But they had built a nice park that reminded me of the kind in America where you could literally walk all day doing major hiking.  In that regard we were unprepared as we started off and discovered the ferry link to France far below our feet which was transporting enormous amounts of cargo and large trucks over to the European mainland.  Next to that was the English Channel looking very sinister in the cold of the day with the fog licking its surface and building up against the cliffs like a crowd waiting to get into a rock concert—anxious and frustrated—and thick.   My daughter and I wanted to get down to the beach which was around 350 feet below to 300 feet and part of the trail system had a means of getting down there with a series of steps and ladders.  So we were headed in that direction when the fog rolled in and took away all our visual reference points of the vast land.

It was easy to see why it was hard to invade England at this point, which was closest to the European mainland. For eight miles these cliffs faced their rivals over the centuries and fog like the one we were experiencing further frustrated such efforts.  The advantage was certainly in favor of the English under any armed attack—which is why one of the biggest castles in all of Europe was there at Dover.  What should have been a 30 minute walk turned out to be several hours because once you get atop of those cliffs and start walking east, they just go on and on.  The trail system was good, but there weren’t signs to say exactly where you were, you had to follow a map, and again, the fog took away our visual references.  So after a lot of walking and passing up the narrow corridor down to the beach a few times, we eventually found it.  At one point in the video I held my camera over the edge to record how far down it was to the beach and the jagged rocks below.  I am particularly proud of that shot not just because it showed the obvious danger of the cliffs.  We were able to walk right to the edge of them and look over, which was dangerous because everything was slippery from the constant dew that was on everything all the time.  But honestly, my new iPhone 7 Plus has a steadycam feature that made that shot possible.  Just a few years ago an over the edge shot like that would have been too jittery to really see what was going on as such a small camera would shake all over the place—even your heartbeat would move the camera looking over such a vast crevasse.  But with the new iPhone, the shot was easy which made recording such a thing so much more achievable spontaneously, which is what this little hike was all about.

Once we found the way down, we worked our way through to find eventually that the entire path had been washed out and destroyed by the erosion from above. A large rock had fallen and taken out the bridge that led over to the ladder which dropped everyone the additional forty feet down to the beach.  So we stopped there and took our pictures and soaked up the moment. We had been walking around for an hour and a half just to get to that point and knew it would take a while to get back, and that the rest of our family was waiting for us with a newborn baby.  But for that moment we didn’t worry about it.  We were just a dad and daughter relishing an adventure that comes so seldom.   We  embraced the moment without regret.  As we were looking at the ocean a little seal came up to the beach then retreated to the deep water again.  It was a nice moment.

We returned to the car an hour later to find our family patiently waiting. We were covered in sweat and chalk from the cliffs as we had to climb back up and out.  We had walked five miles and we felt it, especially the nearly vertical climb back up from the beach. And that moment became one for the record books.  We won’t ever forget it because it was a fine example of the benefit of spontaneity.  I have a reputation in my family of getting the most out of unplanned circumstances.  I’m not one that likes to plan things out with too much detail because I don’t want to miss the hidden opportunities that might come up while exploring something.  So I typically have a rough idea of what I want to do then improvise as I’m doing it adjusting to the situation as it presents itself.  But adulthood is all about schedules and deadlines, so it can be tricky business to live the way I do and most adults don’t enjoy it.  However, I raised my daughters with that kind of thinking so they crave it all the time—and most of the time are disappointed by the realities of life that does require plans and forethought.  Personally, it would have been easier to stay in the car and do something more conventionally, especially after exploring the castle at Dover.  But the opportunity was there so it’s good to take it when you can.  Many times, the best things in life come when we don’t see them or plan for them.  And that little moment in time with my oldest daughter was very special and a natural outgrowth of the spirit of adventure.  By the time we returned to the car, we had both grown a little from the experience and the exhaustion that often comes with doing things outside of one’s comfort zones carried us to a new level that defies explanation—but it sure makes you sleep well at night.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

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